What ‘Food Revolution’ Means to Me.

Anyone who’s been following FoodGrads will know I use the term ‘Food Revolution’ a lot.

The concept became widely spread by Jamie Oliver and his brilliant efforts towards educating people about healthy food especially kids across the globe.

Food Revolution Day is an annual global day of action that celebrates good, fresh, real food. It’s a day to shout about the benefits of cooking from scratch and, ultimately to show people that not only is fresh food tastier, changing their food choices can also make them healthier and happier. This year Food Revolution Day is, above all, about sharing the power of cooking!

FoodGrads‘ mission is to connect students and recent graduates with employers in the industry.  To support them in starting their career in food.  But a much larger issue–a fundamental problem facing the industry–is attracting people to pursue careers in the food sector.  Our mission!

So when I mention ‘Food Revolution’ I use the term with a wider purpose in mind.  We need forward thinking, socially conscious, curious, problem solving, leaders to join this sector on a global scale.

Often when we think of food as a career we believe the only option is to become a chef and strive for stardom.  If we don’t become the next Nigella Lawson or Padma Lakshmi will we be successful?

Do we even know any famous food scientists? Come to think of it, where are all the female food scientists?  There are so many vocations available that lead to a meaningful, prosperous career in food.

We need to talk about them, celebrate them and bring awareness to the challenges facing the industry.

Food sustainability is a major problem that we all face.  The global population is expected to grow to about 9.6 Billion by 2050.  Climate change is affecting farming methods, and countries are struggling to address both malnutrition and obesity as well as other health concerns linked to food.

We’re not just an economic engine any more, we’re also becoming the gatekeepers of the well-being of the nation. We’re responsible for people’s health – Alain Dooher

Conversations we need to be having about the future of food

How can we recruit people into the food industry?  To pursue education that will give them food credentials that the industry needs?

What can we do to increase awareness?

How will governments and the food industry respond to the challenges of feeding the world in 2050?

How do we appeal to the next generation knowing that the future of food–health and sustainability– is in their hands?

Big things sometimes begin in small ways (I borrowed that from somewhere) and having the opportunity to meet the people in this sector–as I have over the past 10 years–truly gives me hope that united we can make a difference.

Please leave your comments, suggestions and ideas below!